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This year’s international conference, that took place in Caxias do Sul, was, as expected, amazing. I was not sure I would be able to participate until the last minute, therefore I didn’t submit any papers, however, I had the chance of “relaxing” and enjoying the 'backstage'. These types of conferences will surely provide you with a holistic view of the EFL area, and I say that firstly because you will able to meet teachers from various backgrounds: Teachers who love using technology in their classroom (with a learning purpose, of...

When it comes to the topic of social media, most of us will readily agree that it has changed the way we communicate, work, enjoy ourselves and engage with the world around us. Where this agreement usually ends, however, is on the question of connectivity. While some are convinced that social media is far and away the greatest marketing and networking tool, others argue that it represents something closer to the downfall of our society as it is believed to increase the levels of narcissism and individualism. Every so...

It was two years ago today that I wrote a post for this same blog entitled Why don’t we talk about writing? The 15th BRAZ-TESOL International Conference had just ended and I discussed why there were so few talks on the subject of writing and why not many people chose to attend them, mine included. I was disappointed with the small turnout in my talk with my colleague Silvia Caldas, and also with the very little focus on this subject in conferences in general, and I conjectured why this...

One of the most intriguing new concepts around bilingual education in the 21st century is translanguaging. According to Ofelia Garcia in her book Bilingual Education in the 21st Century - A Global Perspective, translanguaging is "the act performed by bilinguals of accessing different linguistic features or various modes of what are described as autonomous languages, in order to maximize communicative potential" (Ofelia García, 2009: 140). But what is it in practical terms? Think back of the time when you only knew one language. You were limited to one linguistic code, to one...

Image Credits https://goo.gl/R2jQy3 In a week from now a lot of teachers of English from Brazil and abroad will be attending the 16th Braz TESOL International Conference. Bearing this in mind, it reminded me of two plenary sessions from the14th BTIC, four years ago in João Pessoa (PB- Brazil), when both Luíz Otávio Barros and JJ Wilson talked, among other things, about the importance of PD as an ongoing process. And you might be thinking:  Are you writing about PD again? And I say: Yes. Why not? I need it....

The most important single characteristic of the flipped classroom is the fact that classroom time is not used for content presentation, but rather for group discussions about students' findings and further investigation. So, going back to the two questions I’ve asked on my first post, on the 6th of June, I believe we already have an interesting answer to the first question. (What to do? Flip the classroom.) But we still need ideas on how to start the journey. A good way to start flipping your classes is to...

There’s a woman with a standing microphone next to a wooden stool on a stage. She speaks for about an hour and the paying audience laughs every now and then. What is this? It’s a stand-up comedy. Or maybe it isn’t. Oftentimes, when we are working on skills in a language class, we treat genres as something simple to identify. You see the characteristics of the the text, you can tell the genre, or so we would like to think. Sometimes we can do that even before reading or listening...

Last month I had a rather uncomfortable experience when one of my blog lessons was shared with a group of teachers. The vexation occurred when I got to know that the lesson was being shared without the credits. The topic of the lesson was about the trucker’s strike that took place in May here in Brazil. Thus, let me describe how the preparation took place: First of all, I decided that it was of paramount importance that my young adult students (advanced / 15-18) were more aware of what had...

Criticism hurts. Hence, it can be stressful, tense and sometimes traumatic. Still, it is such a natural part of life, including professional life, that knowing how to make the best out of it is an important skill for us to keep emotionally healthy. Below I list a few aspects to consider and that can prove useful in our field. Criticism or feedback? We are faced with criticism on a regular basis and no matter where it comes from, we have to learn if it is meant to be...

I have recently discussed with another teacher that we should never lose track of the lessons we learn from inspirational teachers. We learn a lot throughout our professional teaching lives, but also from our long-lasting lives as learners. We take courses, study, research, observe. In this post I would like to write about those teachers who inspire learners to act, think, be curious, be brave and so much more. Those are the teachers that I believe make a difference in the world. I remember one of the greatest teachers...